The texture of potential

Colored pencils in a cup

This picture is on my computer screen saver right now. It’s not an extraordinary photograph but it contains everything I like: a coaster for my coffee, a cup with cats on it, light for reading, and an image-within-an-image of sunshine.

When I view it, I enjoy its textures: the roughness of the sandstone block, the glossiness of the ceramic, the coolness of the stone lamp base, the deep smooth of the leather insert.

I taste the coffee on my tongue and relish the potential of the pen collection. What can I make today?

When we pay attention, pleasures do not need to be dramatic. Sometimes the commonplace suits, just fine!

I am neither an optimist nor pessimist,
but a possibilist.

~Max Lerner~

Come with me on a magical journey

Rowboat to Eliphante

Several years ago I was privileged to be part of a group that did volunteer gardening at a former artist’s home called Eliphante. It wasn’t easy to get to. Here you see us pulling across on a rope tow, from the little town of Cornville in Arizona.

For 28 years, Eliphante was the home  for artists Michael Kahn and Leda Levant. Together they created a magical village, now closed to the public. It is filled with hobbit-like houses, the most amazing art, and a wonderful fount of creativity. You can see some examples of the environment at the home website here. The site is now an official non-profit, so donations are welcome!

The experience has haunted me all of these years and finally today, I begin work on the new Pegasus Quincy novel set, in part, at Eliphante. The working title is Malice in Eliphante, or MIE for short.

Over the next several months I’ll be posting periodic reports on how I am doing with this new writing adventure. I invite you to follow me from start to finish as this new Pegasus Quincy mystery evolves and comes to life.

Welcome!

Tic-tac-toe, free-spirit style

painted schoolbus

This is one determined, retired school bus, pulling that old pickup along behind. It’s almost as though the decorations of new paint on the bus counterbalance the lack of paint on the truck.

I can see in my mind’s eye the fun it must have been to inscribe all of those circles. Now I wish I had taken the time to visit the other side to see if there were corresponding Xs over there!

Life is a great big canvas.
Throw all the paint on it you can.

~Danny Kaye~

Book Review: THE LAKE MICHIGAN COTTAGE COOKBOOK by Amelia Levin

Lake Michigan Cottage CookbookI love reading cookbooks because I get to enjoy all that great food without any calories! THE LAKE MICHIGAN COTTAGE COOKBOOK takes you on a road trip all around Lake Michigan, the only great lake that is entirely within the boundaries of the US.

They say the trip, which encompasses parts of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan, would only take you 14 hours if you drove straight through. I have my doubts!

What makes this book special, in addition to the nifty recipes and amazing pictures, is the sense of local businesses and good food people you’ll encounter on your road trip. The book was printed 2018, so their recommendations are current.

Here you meet the beekeepers and jam makers and restaurateurs that encircle the great lake: The cheese makers of Wisconsin, the cider makers of southwest Michigan and the cherry pie people in Traverse City on the north coast.

Some of my favorites were recipes for cherry-poached pears with marscarpone cream, cheddar cheese scones, beer-battered cheese curd with homemade ranch dip, sweet potato and pineapple salad, red curry chicken skewers with apricot chutney.

It is a fun read, a feast for both the eye and the imagination!

The reality of art

Reality imitating art

The Phoenix Art Museum has a wonderful wing devoted to installation art, modern art, post-modern art. Imagine my surprise when I viewed this picture, looked for the artist’s name, and discovered it wasn’t “art” at all, but rather a shadowed window into the museum loggia. Great fun!

 There’s a saying among prospectors. Go out looking for one thing, and that’s all you’ll find.
~Robert Flaherty, explorer~

Low water crossing in SILENCE IN WEST FORK

One of the fun parts about writing the Pegasus Quincy mystery series is to revisit favorite haunts of mine in the Verde Valley. This low-water crossing is featured in the SILENCE OF WEST FORK.

Peg has just discovered that a possible witness to a murder lives in a hidden shack on the other side of this bridge. But it is a low-water crossing. That means she has to drive through water, hoping that her car won’t slip off either side before she reaches dry land on the other side.

Today, the water is low. When she returns, it may be impossible to cross.

Life is not risk-free, whether in fiction or in the real-life adventures we all face, every day.