Useful trials and errors

Gila Woodpecker Nest

I was walking one morning and discovered in an old sycamore snag, this entrance to a Gila woodpecker nest. The birds are opportunists and will dig out rotten bark to make a soft, protective nest for their young.

What struck me about this opening, though, were the number of false starts that surround it. The bird didn’t immediately say, ah, here, I will build my home. Instead, view the number of beginnings and first attempts that surround it.

Perhaps we should be more like the woodpecker. For each creative endeavor that we try, there will be several tentative jabs and pokes until we find our true stride!

Sculpture is the art of intelligence.
~Pablo Picasso

 

The texture of potential

Colored pencils in a cup

This picture is on my computer screen saver right now. It’s not an extraordinary photograph but it contains everything I like: a coaster for my coffee, a cup with cats on it, light for reading, and an image-within-an-image of sunshine.

When I view it, I enjoy its textures: the roughness of the sandstone block, the glossiness of the ceramic, the coolness of the stone lamp base, the deep smooth of the leather insert.

I taste the coffee on my tongue and relish the potential of the pen collection. What can I make today?

When we pay attention, pleasures do not need to be dramatic. Sometimes the commonplace suits, just fine!

I am neither an optimist nor pessimist,
but a possibilist.

~Max Lerner~

Come with me on a magical journey

Rowboat to Eliphante

Several years ago I was privileged to be part of a group that did volunteer gardening at a former artist’s home called Eliphante. It wasn’t easy to get to. Here you see us pulling across on a rope tow, from the little town of Cornville in Arizona.

For 28 years, Eliphante was the home  for artists Michael Kahn and Leda Levant. Together they created a magical village, now closed to the public. It is filled with hobbit-like houses, the most amazing art, and a wonderful fount of creativity. You can see some examples of the environment at the home website here. The site is now an official non-profit, so donations are welcome!

The experience has haunted me all of these years and finally today, I begin work on the new Pegasus Quincy novel set, in part, at Eliphante. The working title is Malice in Eliphante, or MIE for short.

Over the next several months I’ll be posting periodic reports on how I am doing with this new writing adventure. I invite you to follow me from start to finish as this new Pegasus Quincy mystery evolves and comes to life.

Welcome!

Tic-tac-toe, free-spirit style

painted schoolbus

This is one determined, retired school bus, pulling that old pickup along behind. It’s almost as though the decorations of new paint on the bus counterbalance the lack of paint on the truck.

I can see in my mind’s eye the fun it must have been to inscribe all of those circles. Now I wish I had taken the time to visit the other side to see if there were corresponding Xs over there!

Life is a great big canvas.
Throw all the paint on it you can.

~Danny Kaye~

In the Moon of Strawberries

Picture of double rainbow over Sedona, AZ

What is interesting about double rainbows, like this one I caught over Sedona, Arizona, is that the second rainbow is reversed. It starts with red and progresses to violet on the other side. The second is also softer in hue, and very rare. They just don’t occur frequently.

The second rainbow reminds me of quiet people, those shy individuals who don’t choose to speak up often. When they do reveal their inner selves–wow, so amazing. Worth the wait!

~When you are beside me my heart sings.
A branch it is, dancing before the Wind Spirit
in the moon of strawberries.~

~Objiway love song~

 

Using what lies in front of you

Picture of Agave cactus

My parents and their parents were children of the Depression. They saved string, wore hand-me-down clothes, and ate left-overs–ALL of them! A favorite expression was “Making Do.”

Native American families before the age of supermarkets and department stores did the same thing. In this picture you’ll see, on the right, a healthy agave cactus. Vivid green, with sharp spines at the end of the stalks.

But on the left, you’ll see something even more important. Notice those beautiful fibers that remain when the plant dies? They can be used to make sandals, weave baskets, line baby cradles. Making do.

Because of our routines,
we sometimes forget that life is a
an ongoing adventure.
~Maya Angelou~