Know your rock and trust your mason

Picture of dry rock wall

Old historic buildings in Sedona were often constructed of red sandstone. And skilled craftsmen paid attention to the type red sandstone that they used, for the sandstone was formed by inland seas that rose and retreated. And each time the seas receded, a different type of sandstone was built.

One sediment layer was formed in thin brittle layers of shale while another was the “hold together” sandstone that erodes in soft rounded shapes, similar to Bell Rock near Sedona. If you built a house with the first type, the layers would crumble and shatter, and the house along with it.

I was reminded of that when I visited New Hampshire recently. There, the building rock of choice is granite. The stuff that tombstones are made from.

A house constructed of granite will be there a long time from now. And yet this building material, too, has its own idiosyncratic ways. View the skill it must have taken to construct this granite wall over a hundred years ago.

It pays to understand your rock. And to trust the skill of your stone mason.

It can be everything to have found a fellow bird
with whom you can sit among the rafters while
the drinking and boasting
and reciting and fighting
go on below.

~Wallace Stegner~ 

 

2 thoughts on “Know your rock and trust your mason

  1. Actually hundreds! Although not all on this wall. Constructed as his own retirement mansion by one of the Robber Barons, who instead of building libraries, built this castle on the hill, complete with his own trout lake, golf course, and 50 miles of (private) bridle paths. But the rock work remains, intrinsically beautiful.

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